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An omelette or omelet is a preparation of beaten egg quickly cooked with butter or oil in a frying pan, sometimes folded around a filling such as cheese, vegetables, meat (often ham), or some combination of the above.

Left: A plain omelette.

To obtain a fluffy texture, whole eggs or sometimes egg whites only are beaten with a small amount of milk or cream, or even water, the idea being to have "bubbles" of water vapor trapped within the rapidly cooked egg. The bubbles are what make the omelette light and fluffy. Traditionally, omelettes are partially cooked on the top side and not flipped, even prior to folding.

The fluffy omelette is a refined version of an ancient food. The omelette is commonly thought to have originated in the ancient near-east. Beaten eggs were mixed with chopped herbs, fried until firm, then sliced into wedges. This dish is thought to have travelled to Western Europe via the Middle East and North Africa, with each country adapting the original recipe to produce Italian frittata, Spanish tortilla and the French omelette.

Modern omelettes are cooked with two or three beaten eggs in the pan for one individual serving.

How to Make an Omelette and Scrambled Eggs


What is the difference between scrambled egg and omelette? -  Both are cooked whisked eggs. the scrambled eggs are cooked to be loose and soft, where an omelette is formed into the shape of the skillet and often has a filling.

Omelettes, like scrambled eggs, cook very quickly. Always have your filling ingredients chopped, cooked, and ready before you begin cooking the eggs;

Water, not milk, is recommended for omelette egg mixtures. The water turns to steam, producing a light, airy omelette. Milk is great for creamy scrambled eggs but omelettes require water to give them their lightness;

For omelettes or scrambled eggs use 2-3 large eggs per person, the fresher the eggs the better, but up to two weeks old is fine.


Break the eggs carefully into a bowl and season with salt and freshly milled pepper. Add a bit of a milk or water (1 tbsp for 1 egg). Blend the eggs and milk with a large fork or whisk the number one rule is not to over-mix:

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For the omelette - the size of the pan is vital: too small and the omelette will be thick, spongy and difficult to fold, too large and the eggs will spread out like a thin pancake and become dry and tough. For a 2- or 3-egg omelette, the base should measure 6 inches (15 cm) in diameter. I recommend using a mixture of oil and butter, ½ teaspoon of each. Place the pan on the heat and let it get quite hot, add the butter and oil and as soon as it melts swirl it round, tilting the pan so that the base and the sides get coated:

For the scrambled eggs -  take a small, heavy-based saucepan and place it over a medium heat this is really the only rule; if the heat is too high, the eggs will become dry and flaky. Add half the butter to the pan and swirl it around so that the base and about 1 inch (2.5 cm) of the sides of the pan are moistened with it.


Then, when the butter has melted and is just beginning to foam, pour in the beaten eggs:

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For the omelette - turn the heat up to its highest setting. Then when the butter is foaming, pour the eggs into the pan, tilting it to and fro to spread the eggs evenly over the base. Leave it on the heat without moving it for a count of five.

After this time a bubbly frill will appear round the edge. Now you can tilt the pan to 45 degrees and, using a wooden spoon or tablespoon, draw the edge of the omelette into the centre. The liquid egg will flow into the space, filling it. Now tip the pan the other way and do the same thing. Keep tilting it backwards and forwards, pulling the edges so that the egg can travel into the space left all this will only take half a minute.


Soon there will be just a small amount of liquid left, just on the surface, so now is the time to start folding. Tilt the pan again and flip one side of the omelette into the centre then fold again. Take the pan to a warm plate and the last fold will be when you tip the omelette on to the plate.

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For the scrambled eggs - using a wooden fork or a wooden spoon with a point, start stirring briskly using a backwards and forwards movement all through the liquid egg, getting into the corners of the pan to prevent it from sticking. Don't, whatever you do, turn the heat up: just be patient and keep on scrambling away until you calculate that three-quarters of the egg is now a creamy, solid mass and a quarter is still liquid:

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At this point, remove the pan from the heat, add the rest of the butter and continue scrambling with the fork or spoon. The eggs will carry on cooking in the heat from the pan. As soon as there is no liquid egg left, serve the scrambled eggs absolutely immediately. The secret of success is removing the pan at the right stage, because overcooking makes the eggs dry and flaky:

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Once you've mastered the art of allowing them to finish cooking off the heat, you will never have a problem. If you like, you can add a little double cream or crème fraîche as well as the butter. Serve on buttered toast or bagels or as a dish in its own right:

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Recipe source:

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