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Frappé coffee

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Greek frappé (or Café frappé) is a foam-covered iced coffee drink made from instant coffee (generally, spray-dried). It is very popular in Greece and Cyprus, especially during the summer, but has now spread to other countries.

Left: Frappe Coffee as produced by a hand mixer.

In French, when describing a drink, the word frappé means shaken or chilled; however, in popular Greek culture, the word frappé is predominantly taken to refer to the shaking associated with the preparation of a café frappé.

Frappé is available in three degrees of sweetness, determined by the amount of sugar and coffee used. These are:

  • glykós, ("sweet", 2 teaspoons of coffee and 4 teaspoons of sugar)

  • métrios ("medium", 2 teaspoons of coffee and 2 teaspoons of sugar)

  • skétos ("plain", 2 teaspoons of coffee and no sugar)

All varieties may be served with evaporated milk, in which case they may be called φραπόγαλο (frapógalo, "frappé-milk"), or without.
 

Frappé Coffee Recipe Ingredients

  • 1-2 spoons of instant coffee
  • Tall Glass of cold water
  • 1-3 spoons of sugar (optional)
  • 3-5 ice cubes (optional)
  • Milk (optional; condensed/evaporated milk works best)

Preparation Method

 
  • Put coffee and sugar in a shaker or tall glass and add a little water, just enough to cover the mixture (about 10 ml, or a couple of teaspoonfuls).

  • Shake or stir with mixer until the mixture becomes foamy.

  • Fill the glass with cold water.

  • Add ice cubes, milk (preferably evaporated or condensed milk) or cream to taste.

  • Sip with a straw.

Variant

 

Instead of shaking the initial coffee/sugar/water mix, it can also be beaten with a teaspoon. This needs patience because takes a while to form the mix into a stiff, thick, thoroughly aerated, light brown mousse with a texture like meringue. The advantage of this more troublesome method is that the foam produced when the rest of the water is added is richer and lasts longer. This foam can also withstand hot water, and produce an effect akin to espresso crema.

 

Types

 

  • Ratio of Sugar to Coffee >2/1: Frappé glykós (sweet)
  • Ratio of Sugar to Coffee 1/1: Frappé métrios (medium)
  • No sugar: Frappé skétos (plain)

Any of the above with milk added: mé gála (with milk), e.g. Frappé glykós me gala or frappógalo

 

Source

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